20K hit on Nosferatu Novel

Writing

I’ve got more to type on it, but I don’t feel like working on it this second.

I bought another Leuchtturm Master Ruled Notebook from Amazon (233 pages). But the seller sent me a Leuchtturm SLIM, which only has 120 pages! I can write 100 page in under a month.

So I just sent them a complaint. I’ve already written in it–but I wouldn’ta bought it if I’d known it was a SLIM.

Pretty annoyed, too, paying a full-size notebook price and only getting half the pages. Grr! (Guess that’s another way they could make it up to me–send me another SLIM for free.)

 

 

 

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Fiction Writing: Names are Hard

Writing

After doing a little research, I finally named the Chinese fashionista witch in my latest short story (which has the tentative title of My Frenchie Valentine). Only took 8,000 words!

I’m still struggling on a water faerie name for my nosferatu novel. After researching Irish, Celtic, and Scottish water names (she’s a selkie), I started using “Coventina” just so I could stop typing [name] every time she shows up!  But it’s not ringing the right bells for me. :\

While indexing names for my church calling, I came across the name “Scythia,” which I may try, but…*shrug*

You’ve Disappointed Me, Internet

Writing

I was going to write you a post that went something like this:

What it feels like writing a new novel:

And below that text would be an endless looping animated gif of James Sunderland from Silent Hill 2 rowing his rowboat into a foggy nothingness (see Figure A).

But the internet has disappointed me yet again. There is no endless looping gif of James Sunderland rowing on Toluca Lake.

There are only screenshots, none of which convey the sensation of typing hundreds of words every day, writing scenes as they show up, not knowing where they’ll lead, because you have no plan.

You never have a plan.

All you have is dogged faith that some day, if you keep typing into the fog, the shoreline will appear, and you will wind up there, and you will be finished.

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Figure A